About Products – A Few Things I Think I Think

Inspired by David Lee’s post, I put together a list of current topics that I have found thought provoking. Hopefully, you will find some of them useful too.

  1. I think Clay Christensen’s Milkshake Marketing should be required watching. 
  2. If you are focusing on a SMB SaaS product, read Tomasz Tunguz’s article on the subject. When it comes to a successful SMB offering Tom is spot on when he writes, “The most successful SMB SaaS products typically offer a 2 step value proposition: an initial value proposition to the end user and a longer term value proposition to a manager/decision maker.”
  3. If you have not read the book, Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind, stop right now and go get it.
  4. At some point when building a new company, you have to move from building a product to acquiring customers. Seth Levine writes about the importance of focus during this stage. Seth says, “The important shift here isn’t the shift in hiring more sales people or more marketing people, it’s the shift to recognizing the most important thing is to get more customers. If the whole organization is thinking about this, including engineers, I bet you would come up with a variety of ideas and priorities to meet this. And instead of just the sales guys thinking about sales, you involve the whole team.”
  5. If I had a nickel for every book that was published in the last year about innovation, I would have a lot of nickels. HBR has a good article explaining why more organizations can’t seem to find a way to change – “Companies pay amazing amounts of money to get answers from consultants with overdeveloped confidence in their own intuition. Managers rely on focus groups—a dozen people riffing on something they know little about—to set strategies. And yet, companies won’t experiment to find evidence of the right way forward. “
  6. I think it is worth paying attention to how you can Engineer Serendipity. You never know what you are going to get.
  7. If you are working on a freemium product, learning about your customers is hard. There is a big difference between all the feedback you are going to get from the free users on your site and the select few that are willing to pay you money.
  8. How many times have you heard, “Make it simple”? Probably not enough. David Lieb writes about minimizing cognitive overhead and how if you want to make things simple, sometimes you need to make your users do more – “Minimizing cognitive overhead is imperative when designing for the mass market. Why? Because most people haven’t developed the pattern matching machinery in their brains to quickly convert what they see in your product (app design, messaging, what they heard from friends, etc.) into meaning and purpose.”
  9. Want more engagement? Create a movement – “In a digital and social age, pipes are less important. People are the channel. You don’t own or rent them. You can’t control them. You can only serve and support them.”
  10. Just when you think you have found every useful site there is on the net, you run into a couple of more worth checking out – 100 Websites You Should Know and Use.

Finally, I  put together some thoughts on developing new products and the challenge of trying to tackle two markets at the same time. If you want to check it out, it is on the On Product Management blog.

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