Why I Won’t Use Your Product

(excerpt from my ProductCamp Austin presentation in Feb.)

That’s great that the product you are building is cost effective/innovative/game-changing but the fact of the matter remains, I already have a solution in place for the problem you are trying to solve. Even though it might not be the best, I am not only use to my current solution but it is part of my routine. It just doesn’t matter.

If you have hopes of dislodging this solution, you have to do so in a way that is not slightly better but has a difference that can be measured in magnitudes.

Ben Yoskovitz, author of Lean Analytics, has a great quote on this topic:

Most products don’t hook people because they don’t provide enough value–they’re missing that unique thing that solves people’s problems 10x more effectively than the alternatives.

In order for your product to be adopted there needs to be a path to help users make the transition. You can have the best product in the world but if users can’t figure out how to adopt, they still won’t use it.

A perfect example of this is the Nest thermostat. With a focus on design and self learning, Nest makes managing your home’s heating and cooling easy and cool. But think about how many consumers installed their own home thermostat before the Nest? I bet it was close to 0%. If the makers of Nest were going to get consumers to use their product, they were going to have to get over the installation wall.

So how did they find out what the issue was and how to best fix it?

They studied existing thermostats on the market and installed hundreds of them to figure out how to make it as simple as possible. From MIT’s Technology Review,

Fadell and Rogers have made sure that at every stage of installing and operating a Nest thermostat, you discover that potential problems have been solved for you. When you attach the device to a wall, there’s no need to drill holes or use plastic anchors to hold any screws. Nest’s engineers reviewed every screw on the market and then invented their own, with wide-spaced threads that can bite wood or powdery drywall without making it crumble.

Change doesn’t happen by accident. Plan for it or don’t be surprised when it doesn’t happen on its own.

Ready to learn more, here’s some great books on the topic:

Let mek now if you have a good one to add to the list!

 

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