Dear Product Managers, You Can’t Have it All

 

I love this cartoon from Hugh MacLeod (GapingVoid). It is so simple but at the same time, so powerful.

There are lots of ways you could interpret this message but I have been thinking about it in the context of product development.

More often than not, you don’t have the time or resources to tackle everything. This means as a product manager, you have to make some tough choices of what not to do.

Great products (and companies) intentionally leave out features that some customers find unacceptable. While this means that some customers won’t buy their product, it means they can focus more on the ones that will.

I also ran across another example that I think really highlights the point of intentionally making decisions not to do something. Doc Searls’s new book, the Intention Economy, has a great overview on the grocery chain Trader Joe’s (a company that has been historically very private about its operating strategy).

Here are some of the things that Trader Joe’s says no to:

  • No ads, sales, loyalty cards, etc. No gimmicks.
  • No trade shows. They don’t chase the latest fashions.
  • No muscling suppliers. Instead they partner to offer the best product at the best price.

Most importantly they say no to selling a lot of products. They don’t try and sell every type of food item. They don’t sell electronics. They don’t sell toys. They just focus on selling “innovative, hard-to-find, great-tasting foods.

Trader Joe’s have consciously made the decision to try to not sell everything under the sun. This allows them focus on adding “unconventional and interesting” products that keep customers delighted and coming back for more.

Stick with Hugh’s advice and pick your sliver well, my friend and your customers will reward you.

 

Cartoon Credit:  GapingVoid